Attending a festival of Hamadshi culture

2016 Sidi Ali Hamdush (1) 2016 Sidi Ali Hamdush (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 38-29-30 July 2016 I was invited to attend the Festival of Hamadshi Heritage. It is held annually in the village of Sidi Ali, which harbors the tomb of Sîdî ‘Alî ben Hamdûsh. This 17th century saint is the patron founder of the Hamadsha (or Hamadcha in common French transliteration) Sufi tarîqa.

The village of Sidi Ali sits on the southern slope of Zerhoun Mountain, northeast of the city of Meknes. Jebel Zerhoun is home to a number of shrines, the most important of which is the shrine town of Moulay Idriss Zerhoun. The zâwiyya of Sîdî ‘Alî b. Hamdûsh, which contains the saint’s tomb, is built above a narrow ravine.

The zâwiyya of Sîdî 'Alî ben Hamdûsh sits above a rivine on the slope of Jebel Zerhoun (ph. Eric Ross)

The zâwiyya of Sîdî ‘Alî ben Hamdûsh sits above a ravine on the slope of Jebel Zerhoun. The saint’s tomb is beneath the green-tiled pyramid in the foreground. (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the zâwiyya from above (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the zâwiyya from above (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the zâwiyya from across the ravine (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the zâwiyya from across the ravine (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the entrance esplanade (ph. Eric Ross)

View of the entrance esplanade (ph. Eric Ross)

Hamadsha groups can be found in every Moroccan city and across North Africa. The main pilgrimage to the zâwiyya of Sîdî ‘Alî b. Hamdûsh, where they assemble each year, occurs seven days after the ‘Ayd al-Mawlid (the Prophet Mohammad’s birthday). This will fall in December this year. The cultural festival, however, is held in summer to coincide with school holidays and family vacations. Moroccans living in Europe will also visit Sidi Ali when they come to Morocco on holiday.

Village streets

Village streets

(ph. Eric Ross)

(ph. Eric Ross)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The festival is organized by a local association called the Friends of Sidi Ali for Culture and Development. The theme of this year’s festival, the second it has organized, was “Rhythm and Peace in Hamadsha Art.” Like other Sufi groups, the Hamadsha promote peace, brotherhood and tolerance through their religious teachings and cultural activities.

Group of Hamadshi disciples recite poetry to the rhythm of assorted drums (ph. Eric Ross)

Group of Hamadshi disciples recite poetry to the rhythm of assorted drums (ph. Eric Ross)

Like the Gnawa and the Aïsawa, the Hamadsha use percussion, rhythm and trance to communicate with the jinn, powerful entities in the spirit world which can interfere, for better or for worse, in the lives of people.

One of the most potent of jinn, and something of a trickster in the manner in which she creates and solves problems, is Lalla Aïsha Qandisha. The Hamadsha have specialized in channeling her fierce energy. In the ravine just below the zâwiyya lies her grotto.

The grotto of Lala Aïsha (ph. Eric Ross)

The grotto of Lala Aïsha (ph. Eric Ross)

Stalls near the entrance to the grotto (ph. Eric Ross)

Stalls near the entrance to the grotto (ph. Eric Ross)

Stalls near the entrance to the zâwiyya (ph. Eric Ross)

Stalls near the entrance to the zâwiyya (ph. Eric Ross)

Attendants in the grotto will assist those who are troubled by Aïsha Qandisha by burning candles, incense and aromatic herbs, hanging colored kerchiefs and sprinkling rose-water about the grotto. These goods are sold to pilgrims in numerous stalls in and about the shrine.

 

 

 

Legendary ’70s folk-rock group Jil Jilala gave an evening concert on the village square. Jil Jilala has drawn heavily from Hamadsha musical tradition, among others.

This year’s festival also included the screening of a film about the pilgrimage by Frédérick Calmès. He has promised to upload it to Vimeo, but in the meantime here is an excerpt of a CNN program about the Hamdasha of Fez:

Similar Hamadshi groups are active in Essaouira, Meknes, Sidi Slimane, Taroudannt, Tangier, Beni Ammar and many other towns.

Finally, what would a festival be without a parade, or a pilgrimage without a procession?

(ph. Eric Ross)

(ph. Eric Ross)

Village boys have the honor of parading the flags of the Hamadsha through the streets.

Village boys have the honor of parading the flags of the Hamadsha through the streets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a foretaste of the real deal, the annual moussem (pilgrimage) of Sîdî ‘Alî ben Hamdûsh, held seven days after the ‘Ayd al-Mawlid. It looks like this:

Further reading

By far the best book on the Hamadsha (though I believe it is out of print) is:

  • Vincent Crapanzano (1981). The Hamadsha: A Study in Moroccan Ethnopsychiatry. University of California Press.

 

About ericrossacademic

Professor of Geography at Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco
This entry was posted in shrines, Sufism and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s